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Crane Creek Fishing Reports
This page was updated 12/23/10


The following report was submitted by Andrew Nelson of Springfield on 12/3/10

Date of Trip: 12/3/10
Times Fished: 3:00pm - dark
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Partly cloudy
Water Level: Very low
Water Clarity: Gin Clear
Successful Baits: #14 Caddis

Fished Crane Creek today. Been fishing the lower Wire Road access for a few weeks now. Catching a lot of small guys (4-6 inch), brilliant colors. Also been watching out for reds as I hear this is the time Crane Creek McClouds spawn. Upper wire road has very low to no water, I suppose this is because Crane is a losing stream? Having luck with caddis patterns, and bead heads. Tried pheasant nymphs, hare's ear nymphs with no luck.

Over the years, the springs have moved downstream as the water table has dropped, so that's why the upstream sections are relatively dry now days. That may change in the future, as the water table recharges (assuming it does). Regarding spawning, the McClouds are definitely on their own schedule, but they are technically spring spawners. That means that a sudden increase in water temperature of 2-3 degrees will trigger the actual act of spawning (rather than a sudden decrease, as with fall spawners). But the general timing is dictated by the females' internal clocks, so there can actually be multiple spawns between December and April with most of the activity typically occuring in January and February.





The following report was submitted by Matt ________ of Louisburg on 9/10/10

Date of Trip: 9/4/10
Times Fished: 9:30am - 2:30pm
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Below Average
Water Clarity: Slighty clouded
Successful Baits: Red San Juans, Green Flash Pheasant Tails, Hare's Ear

After reading many of the other postings on this site concerning Crane Creek as well as some first hand experiences of friends who fly fish, I had to try my luck here. I started my day at the upper parking lot and fished the small bridge there and caught 1 very small rainbow, 2 fish around 10"-12" and one 14" rainbow! That fish gave me a REAL tussle on a 3 wt rod and small arbor and the colors of these fish are to be really coveted! Worked the first parking lot I came across till the early afternoon and found a real nice pool between the lot and a bridge that held a few fish around 20" but could not get them to hit either a hopper or nymph. I caught one more fish around 12" and it fought almost as hard as the 14" one earlier, I also saw at least 2 copperheads so be careful walking through the wooded and high weed areas! Can't wait to go back again and try a few other spots there I did not have time to fish this time. Thanks to you who sponsor and write reviews on this site so those of us who love this sport but don't know where to go except Montana and Colorado! I will be back.

You are welcome, and thanks for adding to our body of knowledge!





The following report was submitted by Andrew Stein of Springfield on 7/7/10

Date of Trip: 7/2/10
Times Fished: 3:00pm to dark
Air Temperature: Steamy
Weather: Partly cloudy
Water Level: Average
Water Clarity: Gin clear
Successful Baits: Parachutes, prince nymphs, san juan worms

I've been fishing Crane since I've moved here from Michigan, and there is nothing you can compare to catching completely wild fish! It's not for everyone though -- it's downright tough. But today was one of my better days. I try to get down there at least once a week. I started the day behind the baseball fields in town. From there I waded downstream quite a ways past the train bridge and caught 25 fish, one of which was 20 inches (the prettiest trout I've ever caught anywhere). The majority of the fish came on the prince nymph with a san juan dropper, with most taking the san juan. Then I did some experimenting with a fly that I tied to match the mayfies I had been seeing down there. It's pretty much a para adams with lighter dubbing and a elk hair tail. They WORK like a charm. The creek has been fishing very well for me. I absolutly love the site -- lots of good stuff.

Thanks for the compliments Andrew, and thanks for the report.





The following report was submitted by Frank Davis of Lindenhurst, IL on 6/28/10

Date of Trip: 5/2 - 5/3/10
Times Fished: All day
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Partly cloudy
Water Level: Below Average
Water Clarity: Gin clear
Successful Baits: Dark soft hackle, BH Prince Nymph, BH Caddis

My first time on Crane Creek. Immediately at the parking lot I met another fly fisherman. Turns out he is a regular. He subtly, but thoroughly checked out my intentions and knowledge of the local regs while we were talking. After he appeared satified I was no poacher, he gave me detailed advice which proved completely accurate. A bit more discussion and then he fished upstream where there is a bit of a trail, while I agreed to take the "difficult" access downstream of the bridge. (thanks for the great tips, sorry I forgot your name!)

There are some large fish, they are very wary and they keep deep and under cover. However, they will reliably take a nymph fished deep, and presented with a Leisenring lift, if timed so they don't have to move far. There was little or no hatch to speak of, and only small trout showing any action on the surface chasing stray caddis. I had to work hard for every fish; approaching each pool carefully, studying it for a position to cast without being seen, approaching on hands and knees mostly, through thick brush. Tore my pants up in the knees. I was lucky to hook even one fish per pool, as the rest immediately spook when the action starts. And they do run and jump; many released themselves, at "a distance".

Unfortunately I had a bad case of trout fever, and managed to break off my two best fish, estimated 14" plus. (6x tippet; anything larger and either the fish saw the tippet, or just did not like the nymph's movement; as 5x would not work for me).

Released some decent-sized and very pretty fish, which reminded me a lot of the trout on Blue Springs Creek, where I fish several times a year. Near dark, I had a true monster come tearing out from under a rootwad to attack a 6" trout I was playing. The water got pretty frothy for a few seconds, and the attack did not relent until I stepped into the stream to rescue my catch from its jaws. When I revealed myself, the lunker released his tidbit, and raced back under the bank. Nevermind asking me where or which hole...just that it was a very non-obvious location, with no trail to get there, and pointless for anyone to go looking for the beast. But very nice to know they can get so shockingly big in such a small stream. And that made a good stopping point for the day.

This is not a place to take a prized rod; it would be all too easy to trip and break it when stalking along the very rough and log-strewn bank. High brush, vines and thorns add to the risk. After dark, it would be a nightmare. My brand new bamboo rod, custom finished by my brother for my 50th birthday, survived intact, but I would not chance it again.

Bring lots of beadhead prince and lighter colored caddis pupae, sizes 16 and 14. also you might bring a few larger bead head wooly buggers for the big fish, near dark. Also, just to buck the trend, I did land a few fish with a bronze-peacock herl and starling body feather soft hackle, on a no. 14 2x heavy hook, fished on the swing in the riffly water at the heads of pools. But then I just kind of like that sort of old-fashioned stuff..

Terrific report Frank. Many thanks, and welcome aboard.





The following report was submitted by Virgil Cane on 3/12/10

Date of Trip: 3/12/10
Times Fished: 3:00 - 6:30pm
Air Temperature: Chilly
Weather: Rainy
Water Level: Average
Water Clarity: Gin clear
Successful Baits: #18 BH Yellow Zebra Midge, #14 Hare's Ear, #16 Yellow Soft Hackle

Rod setup: Temple Fork Outfitters, 6ft, 2wt, WF line.

This was my third time fishing Crane creek, the two other previous times were to the "meadows" at Wire Road. I finally caught my first Missouri wild trout this time. I started at the park and went downstream, ending behind the last baseball field. I got a couple 8 inchers, one in some riffles and the second in a small pool next to a root wad. I wouldn't normally mention this one also, because it was so small, but I caught a 3 or 4 incher on the zebra midge. I mention him because of previous reports of not catching any very small fish. Hopefully, this is a good sign of successful spawning seasons.

I also mention my rig, because it helps a lot to have a smaller weight and shorter rod to keep out of the brush. My first time was with a 8'6" 6 weight rod. When I wasn't tangled in the brush, I was slapping the water so hard it probably spooked the fish. I also collected some invertebrate samples: lots of caddis fly larvae with green thorax (about size 14-18), stone fly and mayfly nymphs (14-18), lots of midges, caddis fly adults (14-16). Thanks for the great website. I would be happy to talk about my invertebrate sample in more detail, if someone wants to email me.

Thanks Virgil. Good information re: the bugs. Will certainly come in handy for a lot of people. If anyone wants to get in contact with Virgil to discuss the bug sampling, let me know.





The following report was submitted by Billy ________ of Belleville, IL on 2/25/10

Date of Trip: 2/25/10
Times Fished: 4:30 - 6:00pm
Air Temperature: Chilly
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Below Average
Water Clarity: Gin clear
Successful Baits: Brown crackleback

I caught my very first wild rainbow today right at sunset. I'm a student at Missouri State, and I left right after my history class, getting to the creek around 4:30. I hit a few promising looking pools working my way downstream from the parking lot at Wire Road Conservation Area. I started with a pheasant tail which I promptly lost to a tree and proceeded to lose two more nymphs in two more trees. I switched to a crackleback I tied with bright brown dubbing and a hackle that fishes just wetter than dry and started working my way upstream. At the pool just above the bridge, I hooked and landed a beautiful rainbow around 8"-- by far one of the most rewarding experiences I've ever had. I've fished lots at Bennett and Meramec Springs and once at Blue Springs with no luck, but this was truly awesome. These wild Missouri streams are something special.

I also went to school at Missouri State, and I too used to sneak down to Crane between classes every chance I got. I'm sure that little creek cost me a couple of A's. Thanks Billy.





The following report was submitted by Brent McGuire on 2/3/10

Date of Trip: 2/2/10
Times Fished: All day
Air Temperature: Chilly
Weather: Overcast
Water Level: Average
Water Clarity: Gin clear
Successful Baits: Hare's Ear, Gray Scud

Having only been to Crane once before, I decided to start at the Wire Road area above town. I started hiking upstream and hit the deeper holes I found with a Gray Scud. I got a few small ones but nothing else.

Since my wader boots blew out on me last week I was forced to fish from the bank. It was very hard for me to get a position to cast a fly rod from the bank without spooking the fish or getting hung. A little ways upstream I tied on a BH Hares Ear and tried to find a hole I could approach. I found a nice hole of water and took aim. I got on my knee's and snuck up behind a big tree that I could use for cover. I flipped my fly upstream and followed the fly down with my rod tip and there it was. I set the hook and realized I had got my first sizable McCLoud Trout! The fish was about 12-14" and was the most colorful trout I've seen in my life. The sad thing is while finding a spot to land the beauty he came off, oh well.

I fished the rest of the day below the park and found better water but couldn't do much without my waders. Next time I'll arrive prepared and hopefully get another chance. I definitely have a new respect for Crane and cant wait to learn more about catching those beautiful McCloud Raindows!

Thanks Brent. McClouds are actually classified as redband trout, which is pretty much the same thing as a rainbow. The seperate classification is almost totally due to the colors being sharper and more vibrant than a normal rainbow. In other words, you're right about those colors!





The following report was submitted by Eq Ingerson of Republic on 12/13/09

Date of Trip: 12/12/09
Times Fished: 1:00pm
Air Temperature: Frigid
Weather: Rainy
Water Level: Above Average
Water Clarity: Gin clear
Successful Baits: Small Golden Glo-bugs, Copper Johns

I fished from Wire Road CA to the springs above the parking area. I caught 5 trout: 3 small, one seven incher,and one that would go about thirteen inches. I saw some very large trout in the root wads but they were staying tight. These fish are really spookie. I lost just about a dozen flies so the cost was more than justified. I had my most success in the chutes.

Welcome aboard Eq, and thanks for the report.





The following report was submitted by David McGowan of Columbia on 11/28/09

Date of Trip: 11/19/09
Times Fished: 12:00 - 5:00pm
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Average
Water Clarity: Gin clear
Successful Baits: Soft Hackles, BH Prince Nymph

My brother and I made our first trip to Crane and had a blast. We fished the upper Wire Rd area and landed a total of 5 fish for the afternoon. A few smaller ones and one 15 incher. As everyone says, they are skittish to approach but not picky about what they take. We found one deep scour hole holding a few whoppers, one was over 20", that's where I caught the bigger one. I'm definitely planning another Crane trip soon.

Sounds like a nice day. Thanks David.





The following report was submitted by Alex _______ of Platte City on 11/8/09

Date of Trip: 11/8/09
Times Fished: 10:00am - 4:00pm
Air Temperature: Balmy
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Above average
Water Clarity: Slightly clouded
Successful Baits: Various streamers

I've fished Crane three times this year. Once in the winter, spring and fall. I've hooked a good amount of 16-18 inchers. The place looks in great shape and the fish are plentiful.

Did really well today. The fish were very aggressive and wanted streamers. I tried nymphing a bit but they really want something with some movement. Just to give you an idea of how aggressive they were; a couple of times I hooked smaller bows and a much bigger fish would actually attack the hooked fish. I actually had a 15 incher latch onto a fish of about 11 inches.

The best fish of the day was over 20 inches. It was pretty shocking to hook a fish that big in Crane. Given how small Crane is and how big this guy was it was almost like hooking a steelhead. He really gave my four weight a workout. I've fished all over the US and Crane is a really special fishery.



I love streamer fishing! Thanks Alex.





The following report was submitted by Willoughby Johnson of Westwood Hills, KS on 7/9/09

Date of Trip: 7/9/09
Times Fished: 8:00 - 10:00am
Air Temperature: Balmy
Weather: Partly cloudy
Water Level: Average
Water Clarity: Gin clear
Successful Baits: None but...

After flaming out at Roubidoux I got on the road, spent the night in Springfield and hit Crane creek. I fished beside the baseball fields in fast-moving water. The trout were going for a small brown elk hair caddis but could not land any. 4-5 hits. Henrickson did not elicit interest. I then tried "dappling" in some of the slow, flat water by the park. Crawled on my belly, whole bit. One time I stuck my head up to look at my fly and the the fish got the heck out of there. VERY spooky fish, VERY challenging and fun.

The fish in the park areas are definitely spooky, but that's likely because they get fished and/or harrassed so much. Once you get into the sticks a bit further away from civilization, I bet you'll find them to be let nervous.





The following report was submitted by Matt ____________ of Springfield on 4/21/09

Date of Trip: 4/19/09
Times Fished: 400pm - 700pm
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Overcast
Water Level: Above Average
Water Clarity: Milky
Successful Baits: Black Rooster Tail, Chartreuse Panther Martin

A friend and I ended up at Crane about 4 pm on Sunday, this was only my third time visiting Crane Creek. My first two visits were to the wire road area and unsuccessful. This time I started off behind the baseball diamond and kept hiking back away hitting holes with my spinner rod. The heavy rains from Friday/Saturday had the creek running better than I had seen during my past two visits. The second hole I fished I pulled my lure past the root bulb of a fallen tree and pulled in my first rainbow from Crane Creek. It was a good looking 12-14 incher. Two holes later my buddy had a fish on but it snapped his line. If anyone catches a rainbow with a panther martin in his mouth, my friend wants his lure back. By the end of the short visit we had each landed a nice fish. It was a nice contrast to my first two visits to the "meadows" where the water was scarce as were the fish.

Thanks Matt. I actually usually have better luck fishing the wild creeks when the water is just a bit off color. In fact, I remember having a blast fishing Crane Creek right in the middle of the town park after a good overnight rain -- caught several nice fish that day. Something I have yet to fully figure out -- other than just speculation of course.





The following report was submitted by Andrew Stone of Springfield on 4/27/09

Date of Trip: 3/1/09
Times Fished: Early morning
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Partly cloudy
Water Level: Average
Water Clarity: Slightly clouded
Successful Baits: Copper John

I'm an intermediate flyfisher and found the creek to be challenging, but the scenery was worth it. Fished all day, and on the last cast in a riffle caught a 6-inch rainbow the colors on it were unlike any trout I had ever caught.

I hate to tell you this, but now that you've seen a wild trout up close, those hatchery trout just aren't going to do it for you any more! Thanks Andrew.





The following report was submitted by Beck ________ of Broken Arrow, OK on 2/25/09

Date of Trip: 2/25/09
Times Fished: Afternoon & Evening
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Average
Water Clarity: Gin Clear
Successful Baits: Caddis Nymph, Elk Hair Caddis

This was my 3rd time to visit Crane Creek, but far my best. The weather was a perfect 70 degrees without a cloud in the sky. I parked down by the dairy farm and hiked the trail downstream for a while before actually getting down to it. There were a lot of moths in the air, so I started with an Elk Hair Caddis. No luck for the first few holes, so I changed to a caddis nymph with a weight and immediately got a great 16 inch rainbow. He took as it was rising off the bottom after I let it drift down into a hole. I saw fish hitting the top after this, so I switched back to an Elk Caddis and caught a couple more, one maybe 12 inches and another fingerling. I keep catching catching one fish more than the previous trip, so I'll definitely be coming back!

From everyone's experience, are the larger fish usually feeding deeper? Seems to be what I've seen from my few trips.

Not exactly. The mature wild trout (i.e. 10 inches or better) are just less "spazzy" than the little ones, meaning they'll align themselves in a feeding lane and be content to eat whatever comes their way. They won't get distracted by potential food outside of their established feedling lane. The young 'uns are a more impulsive (aka "spazzy"), meaning they're more likely to swim halfway across a pool to grab a bug they happen to notice, essentially burning 20 calories to eat 10 calories. This is why you're more likely to catch the little ones pretty much anywhere in the stream -- because they're impulsive enough to be all over the place. NOW, the truly BIG wild trout (i.e. 16+ inches) are reaching a stage where they might not be able to maintain their size just grazing on bugs. The ones that learn how to hunt, chasing down sculpins, crayfish, etc. are the ones that will take their growth the next level. Those fish are usually caught on streamers, grasshoppers, etc.





The following report was submitted by Matt ________ of Nixa on 2/15/09

Date of Trip: 2/14/08
Times Fished: 10:00am - 3:00pm
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Partly Cloudy
Water Level: Very high
Water Clarity: Milky
Successful Baits: #16 Red Tungsten BH Midge

First time at the creek. Fished a 9 foot 5wt fly rod, which found to be too long. There was a lot of log jams, overhanging brush, and limbs underwater that were not visable until you snag them. Fished below town at Wire Road, found a few holes that I thought would produce some fish. Never saw one, but was able to hook, land, and photo one beauty about 13 inches. I threw a lot at them different weights, tippets, sizes colors, it was just tough. Next time I go, i will take my 7ft 4wt. I am encourged by some other reports but it was tough with highwater and being unfamiliar with the stream. I enjoyed the solitude not another soul out there.

Side note: I would like to know what the MDC is going to do if anything to clear the main runs of major debris, trees down and large limbs.



Probably nothing. MDC generally restricts that kind of work to maintaining hiking trails, parking areas, picking up trash, etc. Any wild area gets pretty much left to its own devices. The thinking is that the log jams, pile ups and lay downs are all vital habitat for some critter or other. For example, a densely tangled root wad can lead to a population boom of bait fish which will in turn support a larger number of mature trout in future years. HOWEVER, if anyone out there would like to start organizing a community-led clean-up on Crane Creek, let me know. I'll be happy to spread the word. Britt Graber out of the Neosho managed to spark a huge turnout for a similar clean-up effort at Hickory Creek a couple of years back, and it all started with him asking a similar question in a fishing report HE sent in!

BTW, pretty fish! Thanks for the report Matt.






The following report was submitted by John Bloomer of Kansas City on 2/9/09

Date of Trip: 2/8/08
Times Fished: 12:00pm - 5:00pm
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Overcast
Water Level: Average
Water Clarity: Slightly Clouded
Successful Baits: Blue Wing Olive, Black Copper John, Tan Caddis

The wife and I decided to give Crane Creek a try before the weeds grow in and make it a challenge to get in. We fished below the dairy farm in the Chain Road Conservation area and found that the REI stream team had been at work recently with a large pile of tires and other debris waiting to be picked up in the parking lot.

The fishing was tough, as we had expected. In the shallow runs the water was clear, but any of the deeper holes were stained. We saw a few fish holding deep, and the dinks were aggressively hitting top water. There were clouds of midges and what I took to be mayflies hovering around, so we tried tandem rigs with a variety of dries and nymphs. We managed to bring in a couple very small fish on the smaller fies, but never got any interest from the larger fish we saw cruising the depths.

The fish were very spooky. When I tried to fish deep with an indicator, as soon as the indicator hit the water the fish I could see scattered. I don't know if they are always like that or if the work on the stream recently has them nervous.

All in all, though we didn't catch much, it was a great day on a nice stream, which is about as much as we could ask for in February.

At the risk of over-simplifying, you were just witnessing how wild trout behave. The number one thing that spooks mature trout are sudden movements & sounds, and the plop and shadow-rings thrown by a strike indicator hitting the water is at the top of the list. In rivers where the fish receive a lot of fishing pressure, that same plop will startle fish, but they're so much more accustomed to it that it doesn't really affect the fishing. When fishing wilder waters, though, I always encourage people to leave their normal foam indicators at home and switch to indicator putty or indicator yarn. Quieter is better. Thanks for the report John. Hope to hear from you again.





The following report was submitted by Daniel ___________ of Springfield on 11/18/08

Date of Trip: 11/16/8
Times Fished: 9:00am - 2:45pm
Air Temperature: Chilly
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Average
Water Clarity: Gin Clear
Successful Baits: Single-hook spinner,
pearl white midge, orange san juan

This is about my third experience fishing at Crane. It is also the first time I actually saw sizable fish and caught something bigger than a crank bait. In total I caught five fish, and had several missed bites.

I started behind the ball park in town. I found a nice hole where I could see several fish sitting on the bottom. There were several small sunfish in the front and I couldn't seem to get my bead headed nymphs past them. I could have cast to them if I would have fished from the other bank, but I try my best to avoid purple ribbons in trees.

I finally got tired of trying that spot and walked back to my car and got my spinning rod. With it I used a Mepps #0 yellow wooly bug inline spinner. Before going back to my spot I tried casting in the main park just off the train car. About 75 feet from the bridge, in water I thought would be too shallow, I caught two small trout. The first was the smallest of the day, at about 6-7 inches. The second was a bit bigger at about 8 inches.

From there I switched back to my fly rod and went to the south parking lot near the dairy farm. I walked down the path and fished back toward my car. I found a nice spot with a gravel bed holding several good looking fish. I caught the first two on the tiny pearl midge. They were both about 9-10 inches. I noticed there was a good hatch and tried out a small blue-winged olive. There were fish rising and hitting the top but I don't have the best cast/presentation so I gave up on that after a while.

I switched over to the orange San Juan worm and caught my biggest fish of the day. It was about 12 inches and possibly the most vibrantly colored trout I've ever caught. I was trying to wrangle my camera out when the trout did a final roll and came off the hook. Oh well, without a picture it can keep getting bigger in my memories.

Sounds like a great day. Thanks Daniel





The following report was submitted by Tim Homesley of Cassville on 11/7/08

Date of Trip: 11/7/8
Times Fished: 10:00am - 1:30pm
Air Temperature: Chilly
Weather: Overcast
Water Level: Average
Water Clarity: Gin Clear
Successful Baits: Copper john, clousers,
wooly buggers, black stimulators, gray wulffs

Fished crane a bit today, landed and released 29 trout today, one 20" and several in the 14-15", one of the best days ever for me, not my biggest over there, but I've never caught 29 in that short a time over there, fished mostly below town, fished a bit in town below the bridge. Most of my fish came on the copper john and the black stimulator, but my biggest fish came on a tung eyed clouser, and the other bigger fish came on big woolybuggers. It was a good day, I've got lots of pic on my photobucket site.

Nice! The adage that big fish eat big bugs cetainly ain't no lie. Tim is the owner/operator of Tim's Fly Shop, in Cassville. Be sure to stop in for a visit when you're down near Roaring River.

Tim's Fly Shop
Route 4 Box 4088
Cassville, MO 65625

417-847-4956
timsfly@hotmail.com






The following report was submitted by Zach _________ of Crested Butte, Colorado on 11/3/08

Date of Trip: 11/3/08
Times Fished: Late Morning
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Average
Water Clarity: Gin Clear
Successful Baits: Hoppers, prince nymph, hare's ear

My dad and I fished from in town (crane) up to the springs. Great day, warm and sunny. We had success with hopper droppers. Landed four fish but hooked up with about 10. Largest was 14-15 inches. Beautiful trout stream, how could you ever go back to Roaring River when you have this creek.

That's exactly how I feel! I'll bet that 15-incher was a real stunner. Glad you had a good day, and many thanks for the report. Come back to Missouri real soon.





The following report was submitted by Paul Wilson of Olathe, KS on 8/20/08

Date of Trip: 8/16/08
Times Fished: Mid-afternoon
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Very Low
Water Clarity: Gin Clear
Successful Baits: None

I have a question for all you Crane experts out there. I thought I had researched everything there was to research on Crane Creek. My son and I went to Roaring River first, early Saturday morning. Fished it first then headed for Crane. We entered at Wire Road and parked at the MDC entrance and parking lot. From there, we got on to the hiking trail, went about a half mile on the trail finding nothing that looked fishable. We continued on till the trail ran out and that point, jumped in and waded upstream till we came to a hge log jam.

Covering far more of the creek than I expected to, we found nothing at all that looked fishable. My question is, were we just in the completly wrong location? I read a lot about fishing up or downstream of the dairy, which, needless to say, we never saw.

Would like to give it another shot, but in all the creek that we covered we saw nothing. Where did we go wrong?

Thanks for the report Paul. The quick answer to your question is this: The dairy farm is downstream from the town of Crane where the water is bigger. The area I'm assuming you were in is what was once the headwaters of the creek. Those of us who fished Crane 20 years ago called that area "the meadows", but it's mostly dry now days. Read the report immediately below this one, and come back soon! And if anyone else would like to offer Paul some Crane Creek advice, let me know. I'll be happy to put you in touch.





The following report was submitted by Matt ___________ of Ames, Iowa on 8/18/08

Date of Trip: 8/16/08
Times Fished: 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Average
Water Clarity: Gin Clear
Successful Baits: Prince Nymph, Hare's Ear, Pheasant Tails, #10-14

This was my first time fishing crane, started out at the dairy farm. Saw a few fish that might have pushed 18 inches under the bridge. Fished downstream took five fish total. All were in the 9-12 inch range.

Those 18" fish are certainly around, but they are big chickens. Any little thing will put them off their feed. Thanks for the report Matt.





The following report was submitted by Bill Shank of Nixa on 7/16/08

Date of Trip: 7/11/08
Times Fished: Afternoon
Air Temperature: Steamy
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Above Average
Water Clarity: Slightly Clouded
Successful Baits: Red & Pink San Juan Worm

My wife and I decided to fish Crane Creek after reading about it on the web. We started at the upper end near the MDC parking lot at the bridge. On her first cast she caught a nice 12 inch bow. In all we caught around 8 fish in two hours working our way downstream, the size range was from 8in up to 12 inch. I had one nice on on that wrapped me around a rock and I lost him. This was on Friday afternoon then we went back on Sunday aftenoon and started below the city of Crane we caught several fish nothing large but lots of fun.

Sounds like you guys did great! Thanks for the report.





The following report was submitted by John West of Springfield on 3/8/08

Date of Trip: 3/8/08
Times Fished: 12:30pm - 3:00pm
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Above Average
Water Clarity: Slightly Clouded
Successful Baits: Fox Squirrel Nymph, Dry Flies

I started by the dairy farm and worked my way on down. The bends in the river produced a few strikes on the Fox Squirrel Nymphs, mainly on the swing. On down I saw several little McLoud's rising to take flies off of the water. An Elk Hair Caddis worked very well. The only problem was that the water was so high it was hard to find spots to cross the creek. Where I was throwing dries I had to stand on the bank about 2 feet above the water. If I could have gotten to the other side it would have been outstanding. That's my first successful trip to Crane Creek. None of the McLoud's had any size, but catching ANYTHING on Crane Creek is a great day!

My son makes fun of me for getting excited about catching a 9" wild trout. Once he has the experience, though, he'll get it. Glad you get it, too! Thanks John.





The following report was submitted by Kyle Buzzard of Diamond on 1/20/08

Date of Trip: 1/20/08
Times Fished: 8:00am - 1:00pm
Air Temperature: Frigid
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Above Average
Water Clarity: Gin Clear
Successful Baits: Weighted wooly worm, hares ear nymph with and w/out beadhead

I have never caught a trout out of Crane Creek before let alone seen one up close, so I had a good day. I started at the park and worked my way downstream to the bridge. Above the bridge there is a pretty good spot with current and depth, so I tied on a weighted wooly worm with a BH Hares ear nymph. After a few casts I hooked up with what I thought it was a Chub, but to my surprise it was a pretty little rainbow of about 6 in. Caught two more there and went on downstream and caught four more of about the same size 6 to 8 inches. Left there and went to the Wire Road Access across from the dairy farm that I've read about. I headed upstream from the bridge and started to fish a good looking hole after changing the BH to # 10 Hares Ear Nymph. Missed a good 12 inch fish so I flipped it back out and let it drift back to me. I saw a nice fish come in and take my wooly worm. When I set the hook I knew it was a very nice rainbow worthy of a photo and measure. He went 16.5 inches and put up a great fight. After returning him safely I cast back to the same and had another nice fish of about the same size take my nymph and head straight for a downed tree. I tried to turn him and the hook came undone. I caught four more little ones with the biggest about 10 inches.



Wow! Way to break the drought Kyle. Thanks for the report.





The following report was submitted by Daniel _________ of Springfield on 12/30/07

Date of Trip: 12/30/07
Times Fished: 11:45am - 2:00pm
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Average
Water Clarity: Gin Clear
Successful Baits: None

I am new to fly fishing for trout, but not new to small stream fishing. I thought I would give Crane Creek a try. I had a wonderful time out there all alone, however I found very few fish worth mentioning. Most were fingerlings up to about the length of my hand. There may have been more fish out there that I probably scared off. I started the morning off at the south parking lot of the main tract but could not find water. I went up to the north parking lot and worked my way back down. I was using small jigs and a bead head prince nymph, I think. Haven't figured out all the names for the flies yet. I wanted to go try the area south of town, but by the time I found it I did not have much time. I'll save that area for next time.

Crane Creek has a knack for humbling fishermen. I always had my best luck there using smallish natural nymphs (i.e. #16 pheasant tails, hare's ears, etc.), largish natural looking dries (i.e. #14 adams, elk hair caddis, etc.), and black ants in the summer were also usually a hit. Aside from that, if you can see the fish, it's already gone. Long delicate casts to decent looking spots way before you get to the spot is the key. After fishing it a few times, you'll get the hang of that. And once you start consistently catching wild trout, it will hard to go back to stocked areas. Thanks Daniel.





The following report was submitted by John Venter of Joplin on 11/29/07

Date of Trip: 11/25/07
Times Fished: 10:00am - 3:30pm
Air Temperature: Chilly
Weather: Rainy
Water Level: Below Average
Water Clarity: Slightly clouded
Successful Baits: Wooly Bugger, Cressbug

Fished the lower access on Sunday. No other people were fishing that day. Weather was light rain and drizzle with air temp of 36 F. I caught one 14 inch fish on an olive # 10 woolybugger bounced of the bottom of a deep run. and 3 others in the 8-10 inch range on a cress bug. Watch where you step while wading as I did encounter a steel trap that I nearly stepped on. Fortunately it was in shallow water.



That's a good day of fishing. A hatchery can raise a 14" inch fish in about 14 months, but in the wild it takes 3-4 years. The smaller fish were probably 2-3 years old. It worries me a bit that you didn't catch any 4-inchers. I hope that doesn't say something bad about last spring's spawning efforts. And, yes, everyone watch for traps. Trout streams are prime habitat for trapping otters, and at a $150+ per pelt, you'll find traps out year 'round -- yes, that means poaching for dollars. Watch your toes.





The following report was submitted by Beck of Broken Arrow, OK on 12/3/07

Date of Trip: 11/17/07
Times Fished: 12:00 - 3:45pm
Air Temperature: Freezing
Weather: Rainy
Water Level: Above Average
Water Clarity: Gin Clear
Successful Baits: None

Tried my hand at Crane Creek for the first time yesterday...what a BEAUTIFUL place! I had a great time scouting it out, but had no luck with the trout. The flow seemed pretty strong compared with what I'd seen on the previous posts here. I fished south of town near the dairy farm... wading downstream. The weather was very cold, cloudy, and raining for much of the day, so I had trouble seeing many fish. All I had was a 5wt rod that was too long for all of the brush... next time I'm definitely bringing the right tools for the job! Anyway, just wanted to comment on a great stream and an awesome posting board here. Thanks.



Dont' mention it. For the record, NOBODY enjoys any real success their first time to Crane Creek. The first trip is just getting your ready for your next trip. Thanks for the report Beck.





The following report was submitted by Jonathan of Webb City on 12/15/07

Date of Trip: 9/17/07
Times Fished: 7:00am - 1:00pm
Air Temperature: Sultry
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Very Low
Water Clarity: Gin Clearn
Successful Baits: None

I went to crane creek with my dad and brother never having fished the creek before. We started at the first parking lot heading east towards crane; we walked down the creek fishing the shallow creek and looking for any signs of trout but never saw any fish. So, we packed up and headed to the parking lot by the springs and fished the stream in this area having similar luck. Because this was my first time fishing the creek I'm not to distraught about the trip but I plan on heading back soon. If you have any advice on where to fish and some tatics when fishing for the McCloud Rainbows I would appreciate the input.

Crane Creek has certainly humbled it's share of fishermen over the years. The best advice I can give is this. First, don't expect to see the fish. Wild fish are extremely nervous and will take off the moment anything seems abnormal -- they'll usually be gone before you can get into a position to spot them. Your best bet is to work upstream, read the water from a distance, and cast to where your instincts tell you a fish should be. Long leaders and delicate casts are a must. They need to see the fly before they have any notion that there are people there. The fact that there were three of you fishing together is probably a big reason you didn't have any luck -- solo fishermen usually do better. Last thought is to head further downstream where the water is bigger. The headwaters have been EXTREMELY low for several years now, but there are reports that the fishing downstream from town has been pretty good. Many thanks Jonathan.





The following report was submitted by Mike Grube of Shawnee, KS on 8/31/07

Date of Trip: 8/30/07
Times Fished: 8:30am - 12:30pm
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Partly Cloudy
Water Level: Below Average
Water Clarity: Gin clear
Successful Baits: Hopper, Yellow Humpy

I fished the creek down by the dairy farm. The last time I fished Crane Creek was September of last year. I thought the water level of the creek was higher and had a stronger current this year. Hopefully, this is good news for the stream and rainbows. I caught eight fish, the two biggest fish were about 12 inches. The larger fish are difficult to keep out of the brush/sunken trees/etc. It was amazing how high those two fish jumped out of the water trying to throw the hook. Don't see that at the trout parks.



Ain't that a fact! Wild fish are certainly something special. Thanks Mike.





The following report was submitted by Todd Holt of Monett on 8/3/07

Date of Trip: "two July afternoons"
Times Fished: 100pm - 5:00pm
Air Temperature: Steamy
Weather: Partly Cloudy
Water Level: Below Average
Water Clarity: Gin clear
Successful Baits: Red San Juan Worm, BH Pheasant Tail were the best!

I parked at the first parking lot off of 413. I had to hike quite a ways (probably a mile and a half or so) which was fine going, horrible coming back in waders. EXHAUSTING!

I hadn't fished Crane Creek in quite a while and decided that I would go out and, if nothing else, enjoy the hike and being alone (sometimes we have to do that).

As I walked the creek bank I watched for deep holes that I could see fish in. I saw several small trout in some faster running shallow pools hiding under the bank and picked up one that may have been 8 inches. I walked on farther to a hole I have fished before and that I knew would hold fish. There is some current at the top of the hole and then it spreads out, goes deep (5-7 ft) and runs under a big tree with some cut bank on one side. I waded in down from it, crossed over (QUIETLY) and got to where I could make somewhat of a cast. I had a red san juan worm on and immediately caught the largest Crane Creek Rainbow I have ever caught. I notched my pole so could measure when I got home. He ended up being about 14 1/2 inches. I fished the hole for about 3 hours taking 10-15 minute breaks now and then. I ended up catching 6 total. Some on the San Juan worm, some on a tiny (18-20) BH Pheasant Tail.

Now on a personal note . . . . those that fish Crane Creek will know what I am saying . . .there is something almost mystical about catching one of those fish. They are truly unlike anything we catch at one of the parks. They are beautiful and then when you think that they are truly wild, well that makes it all the more special!

Yep, they are completely different from our other Missouri trout. In fact, they are a strain of redband trout, which is one reason that their coloration can be so shocking at certain times of the year. Congrats on your 14 incher. That's a real trophy. Thanks Todd.





The following report was submitted by Rodney Holland of Springfield on 5/23/07

Date of Trip: 5/23/07
Times Fished: 8:00pm
Air Temperature: Sultry
Weather: Partly Cloudy
Water Level: Very Low
Water Clarity: Gin clear
Successful Baits: None

The ice storm has really played havoc on the creek. There are trees down everywhere, and it was very difficult to walk the stream without getting out and walking around on the bank. I fished from the 2 springs down to the second bridge. Only saw one trout, and the stream was really low.

Yes, Crane Creek is certainly struggling right now. The best luck is apparently happening further downstream where there is bigger water. I haven't been in several years, but it sounds like some of my favorite spots are now pretty much dry. Hopefully, we'll continue to get decent rain to recharge the spring pool, but this will take several years, at best. Thanks Rodney.





The following report was submitted by Jarod Jones of Bolivar on 2/21/07

Date of Trip: 2/21/07
Times Fished: 7:45am - 1:45pm
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Average
Water Clarity: Gin clear
Successful Baits: John Deer Jig, Glo-ball (flesh colored), Marabou

It was a great day to be out. It was deceiving to cross the creekbed after the railroad tracks and see no water, but take a right on Roundhouse Rd. and go to second parking lot. Only found one good holding spot about 1/2 mile from parking lot, but it had 8-12 good rainbows, three 20"+. Caught one nice 13" and two 8" out of same whole. Saw probably 20+ fish on the day. Definitely worth the trip.

Talk about finding a honey hole. Nice job Jarod, and thanks for the report.





The following report was submitted by Jeff Harper of Rogersville on 6/28/06

Date of Trip: 6/24/06
Times Fished: not listed
Air Temperature: Sultry
Weather: Partly Cloudy
Water Level: Very low
Water Clarity: Gin clear
Successful Baits: Doll Flies

First time I have visited Crane for a couple of years. The Creek is in a dire situation as far as I'm concerned. Crane has always been known to me as a losing stream, meaning a portion of the flow disappears into the stream bed, reappearing further downstream. When I first began fishing the area about 20 years ago there was a stretch of about a quarter of a mile that would go dry during the parch of summer or dry spells, with one particular hole being the terminus of the upper flow. About 3 or for years ago a large slough off of the creek became the terminus as the floor of the slough collapsed and the water flowed in. This extended the the dry portion of the stream to perhaps one-half to two-thirds of a mile. This trip revealed the dry portion has extended another couple of hundred yards upstream, further detaching the upper and lower flows of the stream. The extended dry spell in southern Missouri has made this losing stream scenario particularly difficult for the trout. I also believe aquifer depletion may be depriving the stream of flow from the springs on the old Leake property. Pools that at times would support over 100 trout in the late 80s and early 90s are now bone dry. My hope is that some rainfall that is at least average for the area will restore some of the flow and the trout can recover. Back in the 80s and 90s the creek supported an amazing population of the trout and I would commonly see fish over three pounds. A few individuals I kept track of for several years I estimated would weigh 7-10 pounds! I do not have the time to fish the creek as much as a I did back in those halcyon days, but I have not seen a fish over three pounds for years now. I believe there are some bigger fish still there, but the population is now maybe 15 or 20 percent of what it was 10 years ago. I caught no fish this trip, but I mostly spent my time observing the fish and trying to photograph some of them. Some of my most memorable catches and hook-ups have come on Crane. I hope I can take my children there in the future and have them experience the joy of catching some of the most beautiful rainbows in the world.

Thanks for the report, Jeff. The creek is definitely as low as anyone can remember. MDC fisheries department has assured us, though, that the trout population is not in any real danger. Numbers are down due to weaker spawning results due to the low water. This is completely normal, as every body of water can only support a specific amount of pounds of fish per volume measure of water. When the water levels return (hopefully someday), so will the numbers and size of fish. However, it will likely be some time before we'll see the return of 10-pounders. And, yes, to those of you who are skeptical. They really did exist.





The following report was submitted by Brian Moeller of Kansas City on 2/27/06

Date of Trip: 2/26/06
Times Fished: 7:30am - 2:00pm
Air Temperature: Chilly
Weather: Sunny
Water Level: Very low
Water Clarity: Gin clear
Successful Baits: #18 Beadhead Olive Midge, #12 Beadhead Fox Squirrel Nymph

The water is dangerously low and clear. The fish were concentrated in the pools and what runs are still flowing. Went to the lower access. You're not gonna believe this, but I caught a 19" rainbow on the midge. Appeared spawned out, big head and skinny body. Got pics but not digital. Also a 15" with hook jaw on the midge. Fish are laying low in the pools. Cast without spooking, and let it sink. The fish will come slowly and suck it in. Upper access and the city park basically all gravel. NO WATER!!!

Thanks for the report Brian. A 19" catch on Crane Creek is a true trophy. For that matter, a 15" fish is nothing to sneeze at either. We're all praying for a wet spring to recharge Crane Creek's water table. Missouri Department of Conservation has probably obtained brood fish from the creek to prepare for the possibility of having to reseed the creek, should the low water result in a significant trout decline.

BY THE WAY, the city of Crane has scheduled a Crane Creek trash pick-up day for Saturday 3/18/06, and they'd love to have some trout-fishing volunteers to help with the effort. Give us a yell if you're interested, and we'll get you set up to help.






The following report was submitted by Bob Andrews of Springfield on 1/21/06

Date of Trip: 01-20-06
Times Fished: 10:00am - 2:00pm
Air Temperature: Comfy
Weather: Partly Cloudy
Water Level: Very low
Water Clarity: Gin clear
Successful Baits: GB Hare ear #14

I fished from just below the railroad bridge south of town to the 413 bridge. The water was ultra low. I caught and released a few very small rainbows. I used a 7.5' Fenwick rod, no vest or net, just what I had in my pockets. I honestly would not reccomend fishing this area right now as in some places the creek was just a small trickle. Above town at the conversation area the creek was dry. There was plenty of small fry. If the rains come the McCloud rainbows will survive. I suspect this hardy strain has seen worse.

Thanks again for the help, Bob. Water levels across the state are very worrisome, but especially how they are affecting our little babbling brooks like this one.





The following comment was submitted by "Joe" on 11/8/05

I just read the report on Crane Creek (see below). I don't think the creek suffers due to the fact you can keep one fish over 18". It has suffered due to low flow. Keeping one fish over 18" will only help in my opinion. You have to realize how long it takes one of those fish to grow to 18" and most likely it is at the end of it's life. By taking it you may be freeing up a spot for a slightly smaller fish to take over the older ones territory and grow big itself. I have fished Crane 3-4 times in the last 2 years and I have yet to see a fish over 15-16" anyway. I do accept the fact there are fish that big in there though.

Thanks for the comment, Joe.

You are probably correct in your statements (low water and otters are probably doing 100x more damage than angler harvest). However, most fishermen we've heard from say they wish the MDC had left the creek's regulations unchanged. This desire is likely tied to our emotional attachment to this fishery, our pride in having one of only three remaining wild McCloud populations, and our fear that it will be exploited. I too wish it would remain catch and release, although removing a few dominant fish would strengthen the gene pool -- smaller fish are better able to compete with each other rather than with the resident big bruiser. My own fear is that the new regulation might make a bit of "harmless" poaching seem more acceptable to some less reputable anglers.






This report was submitted by David Pettit on 10/9/05

Fished Crane Creek on Oct. 8. The weather was sunny and warm considering it started with frost that morning. I arrived and started fishing around 10:00. The water is way down and the fish are "holed up" in the deep holes. I didn't see many fish. There was some caddis activity but I saw no signs of trout taking topwater. I started by parking across from the dairy (downstream from Crane) and walked downstream and worked my way back. Had a couple of strikes by small fish but couldn't even tell if they were trout or not. I got hungry about noon and went to the truck for some lunch. I decided it might be a good time to move so I left and stopped at a fishing/hunting shop across from the baseball fields in town. Sorry, I don't remember the name of it but they were helpful with info and even let me park on their lot while I fished by the ballfields. Here is where I found some nice fish. I stood in the pool with them some 10-20' away. They didn't seem as "spooky" as the fish downstream. I worked them and hooked two over 15". One on a white glowbug and the other on a small Clouser minnow. They were feisty and both broke me off in the brush. I worked downstream but didn't have any more luck. Not a bad day but am still disappointed with Crane Creek being designated a "Blue Ribbon" stream and the ability to keep a fish. I'm afraid it will (or already has) taken a toll on the amount of wild McCloud River rainbows in the stream. I think it would be better served to remain catch and release only.

Amen to that, brother! We can only hope that only serious conservation-minded fishermen are looking at Crane Creek, so it will remain mostly catch and release. Thanks for the report, David. Welcome aboard.





This report was submitted by Wes Carillo on 5/5/05

Fished Crane Creek Saturday April 30th from 2:15 until 4:30. The water was flowing pretty good and it was still very very CLEAR!!! I was only able to fish there in the city park as I wanted to try out my new 9í 6wt G Loomis IMX rod. There were TONS of bugs coming off. I saw black caddis, blue winged olives, and some other bigger mayfly, but they were coming off like Iíd never seen Ďem come off on a Missouri stream. However, there were NO risers to speak of, but the nymphs were probably the key. I fished all of the deep fast water I could find as those seem to be the typical hiding spots. I got several bites on my sz 10 olive cone head wooly bugger. I missed the first several fish that hit the fly. I found a good little spot and drifted my fly down and started to strip it back up stream. I saw a FLASH and felt a little tug. The fish looked to be of GOOD McCloud size from what all I had heard. But I missed him. But I tried again! It took several casts, but I finally made a good one. The fish shot out and missed the fly...at this point on was on the verge of cussing. But he shot back in and hammered my fly hooking himself solidly in the side of the mouth. My heart started pounding, especially whenever it turned and I saw the big silver side flash in the sun. I had to walk up stream to find a place to get to the water, the whole time praying the fly didnít come loose. I finally pulled the fish to hand and measured him on my rod...heís right at 15Ē and I take the hook out and send him on his merry way. I had to have a seat after that...my heart was racing. I have caught a Greenback Cutthroat and Wild Brookies in Colorado and even some Wild Rainbows in Alaska, but none took the beauty of this fish. My first fish on the fly rod I helped to build and he was a nice McCloud Rainbow.

I was completely satisfied with my trip at this point and Iíd only been there a short while, but I continued to fish. I went up stream to a bridge but had no luck, except for falling and losing some flies, I guess I had bad luck. So, I came back downstream and fished below the walking bridge and then below the highway bridge. I managed to get several fish to rise to a dry, but no hookups. So I tied on an olive leech, got a hit no hookup. So I then tied on a sz 14 bead headed prince nymph, and got several good strikes and hookups, but didnít manage to bring any to hand. All in all, it was a wonderful fishing trip. I canít wait to get back down there with more time and a short rod. However, if you go, make sure to wear your waders because I got pretty friendly with several water moccasins and in one case friendly with about 5 or 6 at one time. They were in the tall grass on the horse shoe pit side downstream of the walking bridge.

That is one gorgeous place.


Thanks, Wes, and congratulations on your first McCloud! They are beauties, but you should see them in January and February -- spawning season on Crane Creek. That time of year, their colors are breathtaking.





This report was submitted by Brandon Sieckman on 5/1/05

Fished from 2:00pm to 4:30 pm today (5/1/05). Weather was partly cloudy, about 63 degrees. Water was high, but very clear. Fished the south end of the stream, by the dairy farm. This seems to be the only place to fish Crane now as the upper area has apparetly been overtaken by otter. There was a hatch coming off the stream and in certain holes trout were indeed rising. Threw on a size 16 caddis stimulator. In our first hole I had a few looks, but no strikes. My dad got a few stirkes in a hole downstream with a size 12 Muddler Minnow. Didnít catch any at Crane this trip, but in many holes along the strech we fished the water was a tad too high. My dad was using double weights with his muddler to get all the way down.

Thanks for the report, Brandon. Welcome aboard.





This report was submitted by Tim Homesley from Cassville on 2/9/05

Fished crane creek today, caught 7 trout all on a black woolybugger, # 8 conehead, fished my 6'10" scott 4 wt, 5X flurocarbon, frog hair, fishing was good, I should have had 5 or 6 more fish, but some I pulled the fly away from them and the others just got me in some bottom stuff and got off the fly. Fished the lower section east of town, the dairy farm area.

Thanks for the report, Tim. It's good to know that there is still some streamer water on Crane Creek. Tim is the owner/operator of Tim's Fly Shop, in Cassville. Be sure to stop in for a visit when you're down near Roaring River.

Tim's Fly Shop
Route 4 Box 4088
Cassville, MO 65625

417-847-4956
timsfly@hotmail.com






If you go fishing on Crane Creek, please be sure to send us a report about how you did.

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